Joe Bruno on the Mob – Little Nicky Scarfo Denied Bail


I guess if you an alleged member of the Mafia you get treated worse in court than child molesters.

http://www.amazon.com/Mobsters-Gangs-Crooks-Creeps-ebook/dp/B006H99D1U/ref=zg_bs_11010_5

Nicodemo “Junior” Scarfo, the son of jailed-for-life Philly mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo Sr. has been denied bail by a Camden, New Jersey judge while he awaits trial for a “white collar” crime. Yet former Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky, who is alleged to have abused more than 40 boys, is given bail at the reasonably low figure of $250,000. Even disgraced former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich, who was recently sentenced to 14 years in the slammer, is out on bail until he surrenders to prison officials on February 16, 2012.

Scarfo is accused of masterminding a plot to take over FirstPlus, an Irving, Texas-based mortgage company, and draining it of assets alleged to be in excess of $12 million. He also allegedly used the proceeds to buy a luxury yacht called “Priceless,” a $217,000 Bentley, and a private plane.

Scarfo’s attorney Michael Riley said in court filings, after U.S. District Judge Robert Kugler issued the “no bail” decree, that Scarfo Jr. is being punished for the “sins of his father.”

“There are some of us who go through life maybe benefiting from our family’s name and reputation,” Riley told Kugler. “There are others that are hurt.”

Still Judge Kugler was unmoved, saying that Scarfo is “a danger to the community because the 46-year-old has had nearly continuous involvement in the criminal justice system over the last 24 years.”

Judge Kugler went one better, when he insisted that Scarfo Jr. must stay in protective custody in prison because the “Federal detention center in Philadelphia also houses five members of a La Costra Nostra group that tried to kill him.”

Riley told Kugler that this imposes an unreasonable hardship because “the special confinement makes it hard for him to have access to his client to prepare for trial, a daunting task that involves going through more than 1 million pages of documents.”

Going back to the 1930’s, when Special Prosecutor Thomas E. Dewey railroaded Charles “Lucky” Luciano on a trumped-up charge of prostitution into a 30-50 year jail sentence, alleged members of the Mafia are not treated the same in the court of law as are other criminals. The court system seems to say to them that “anything goes” as long as the desired result is obtained: their incarceration in prison for a very long time, if not for the rest of their natural lives.

This people, can happen to you, if one day some ambitious prosecutor decides that the group of people you are associated with fall within their imagined guidelines of “a danger to the public.”

Even Muslim terrorists are treated with more respect in court than members of the Mafia.

You can read the article below at:

http://www.publicopiniononline.com/statenews/ci_19577856

Son of mob boss argues he’s being held unfairly

By GEOFF MULVIHILL Associated Press

CAMDEN, N.J.—Nicodemo “Junior” Scarfo will not be allowed out of prison on bail while he awaits trial in a financial crimes case, a federal judge ruled Monday.

Scarfo, the son of imprisoned former Philadelphia-south Jersey mob boss Nicodemo “Little Nicky” Scarfo, tried to make a case to a judge on Monday that he’s being treated unfairly because of his name and is neither a risk of flight nor a danger to the community and should be allowed to post bail and go home.

U.S. District Judge Robert Kugler found that Scarfo is a danger to the community because the 46-year-old has had nearly continuous involvement in the criminal justice system over the last 24 years.

Scarfo was arrested last month on charges that he and other reputed mob figures took over FirstPlus, an Irving, Texas-based mortgage company, and drained it of $12 million in assets through their salaries and purchases, including a luxury yacht called “Priceless,” a $217,000 Bentley and a private plane.

His lawyer, Michael Riley, argued in court filings last week and in the courtroom on Monday that the government was trying to link Scarfo to the sins of his father.

“There are some of us who go through life maybe benefiting from our family’s name and reputation,” Riley told Kugler on Monday. “There are others that are hurt.”

He argued that his client was in the latter group. He said that there’s no evidence he engaged in criminal activity after May 2008, when authorities

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conducted searches related to their FirstPlus investigation, tipping off the alleged schemers that they were being watched. And he said that the case should not be seen as a matter of organized crime but rather a white-collar crime.

Federal prosecutors, however, said that the alleged scheme relied upon the reputation of Scarfo’s ruthless father—and that he benefited as a higher-up in the Mafia.

Justice Department lawyer Lisa Page pointed to some of the 7,500 recorded phone calls that are part of evidence, saying they show an associate making threats on Scarfo’s behalf.

She also said he drew $33,000 per month from the scheme though he did not make much of an effort.

“The reason he was able to do virtually no work and get 33 grand per month is because of his name,” Page said.

Prosecutors also said that Scarfo launched the FirstPlus plan while he was in home confinement following another conviction.

Eleven co-defendants in the case, including Scarfo’s wife, four lawyers and an accountant, are free on bail. Only Scarfo and Salvatore Pelullo remain held.

Monday’s hearing shed light on some of the practical difficulties of being an alleged mobster.

Scarfo is in the federal detention center in Philadelphia. Authorities say he’s in protective custody there because the facility also houses five members of a La Costra Nostra group that tried to kill him.

But Riley said the special confinement makes it hard for him to have access to his client to prepare for trial, a daunting task that involves going through more than 1 million pages of documents.

Kugler said he would not object if Scarfo wanted to be moved into the general population of the prison—but warned him that he could face dangers.

Scarfo said he understood the risks.

“I want to be in general population. I don’t share the same concerns about my safety that the government shares,” he told Kugler. “I just don’t feel like my life’s in danger.”

http://www.josephbrunowriter.com/index.html


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