Joe Bruno on the Mob – Not Many People Show at Funeral For Reputed Mobster Salvatore Montagna


I think it’s pretty clear from the composition of his funeral that Salvatore Montagna was not a very popular man in Montreal, Canada.

http://www.amazon.com/Mobsters-Gangs-Crooks-Creeps-ebook/dp/B006H99D1U/ref=zg_bs_11010_5

Whereas in 2010, hundreds of people attended the funeral masses for Nicolo (Zio Cola) Rizzuto, 86, at Notre Dame de la Defence church in Little Italy, and hundreds more for Rizzuto’s grandson, Nick Jr. at that same church, reportedly only 70 people, if that many, attended the funeral mass for Montagna, 40, at the Notre Dame de Pompeii church on Sauve St. E.

Another hint that maybe Montagna was not too popular in Montreal was that his wake was not held at the Loreto funeral home in St. Léonard, where all big mob wakes in Montreal usually take place. The Loreto funeral home is owned by close relatives of Nicolo Rizzuto and his 65-year-old son, Vito.

It is alleged in the press that Montagna was killed because he was trying to take over the crime family of the Rizzuto’s. The only problem was, Vito Rizzuto – once referred to as “the godfather of the Mafia” in Montreal by the federal government, is still alive and kicking. Vito Rizzuto is presently serving a 10-year sentence in the United States and is scheduled to be released from prison on October 6, 2012.

According to the book Mafia Inc., by André Cedilot and André Noël, Montagna approached Nicolo Rizzuto Sr. in 2010, just before the he was was killed, “and tried to reason with him, telling the patriarch that his reign was over.”

This book also claims that the reason that Montagna was not successful in his takeover of the Rizzuto family was because he was once the reputed head of Bonanno family in America, and it was a Bonnano family member who became the government informant who “gave evidence that led to Vito Rizzuto’s arrest and incarceration in the U.S.”

It will be interesting to see what happens when Vito Rizzuto is released from prison late next year. But one thing’s for sure — Salvatore Montagna won’t be outside the prison in a waiting limo when Rizzuto finally exits its locked doors.

As of this writing, the police have made no arrests in the slaying of Montagna, nor do they have any suspects. In gangland murders like this, there’s maybe a 100-1 shot the killer, or killers will ever be discovered, or arrested.

In fact, they could already be dead themselves.

The article below can be seen at:

http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/show+Montagna+funeral/5777841/story.html

Few show up for funeral of reputed mobster Salvatore Montagna

By Paul Cherry, Gazette Crime Reporter November 30, 2011

MONTREAL – About 70 people gathered in a church in the city’s north end to mourn the death of a man who, by all appearances, had little support in his bid to assume control over the Mafia in Montreal.

Police sources said few faces were recognized among the people who attended the funeral of Salvatore (Sal the Ironworker) Montagna, 40, at Notre Dame de Pompeii church on Sauve St. E. on Monday morning.

The dozens of people, including Montagna’s widow and their three daughters, filed into the church under a grey sky. The funeral mass was said mostly in Italian while most of the pews remained empty.

It was a stark contrast to many of the funerals held in the recent past for men who held influential positions within the Mafia in Montreal.

The funeral for Nicolo (Zio Cola) Rizzuto, 86, was attended by hundreds who packed into Notre Dame de la Defence church in Little Italy. Rizzuto was killed inside his home on Nov. 10, 2010.

It was a similar scene at the funeral that same year for Rizzuto’s grandson, Nick Jr.

And on July 5, 2010, hundreds of mourners filled Notre Dame du Mont Carmel church in St. Léonard for the funeral of Agostino Cuntrera, 66, an influential figure within the Rizzuto clan.

Montagna’s funeral appeared to be attended mostly by close relatives and loved ones.

Before it began, two limousines carrying large floral arrangements, pulled up in front of the church. One included the names of Montagna’s three young daughters and the message “We will never forget you.” The other said simply “Caro Fratello” (Dear Brother).

Montagna was reputed to be the acting head of the Bonanno family in New York before American authorities realized he wasn’t a U.S. citizen and deported him to Canada, his birthplace, in 2009.

When his funeral ended, dozens of people exited the church quietly except for a young woman who yelled “Go home!” to the many camera operators and photographers across the street.

A young man who was with her saluted the journalists with his middle finger.

In a sign that Montagna was considered an outsider to the Rizzutos, visitation over the weekend was not held at the Loreto funeral home in St. Léonard owned by close relatives of Nicolo Rizzuto and his 65-year-old son, Vito.

Police sources have said in recent months that Montagna appeared to be seeking a consensus among the city’s underworld over who should assume control of the Mafia in Montreal in the aftermath of Nicolo Rizzuto’s murder.

Raynald Desjardins, 58, a man with past ties to the Rizzutos, was believed by police to be part of a small group that supported Montagna. Desjardins escaped injury when someone tried to shoot him in Laval in September.

Several potential leaders within the Rizzuto organization are behind bars.

Vito Rizzuto – once referred to as “the godfather” of the Mafia in Montreal by the federal government – is serving a 10-year sentence in the U.S. It expires on Oct. 6, 2012.

Nicolo Rizzuto’s son-in-law Paolo Renda, another past leader in the organization, disappeared on May 20, 2010 and is presumed to have been kidnapped. According to the English version of the book Mafia Inc., by Montreal journalists André Cedilot and André Noël, Montagna approached Nicolo Rizzuto Sr. in 2010, just before the octogenarian was killed, “and tried to reason with him, telling the patriarch that his reign was over.”

The book says Montagna got a cold shoulder, presumably because of his ties to the Bonanno family that produced the informant who gave evidence that led to Vito Rizzuto’s arrest and incarceration in the U.S.

The Sûreté du Québec have said little about their investigation into Montagna’s killing, and no arrests have been made. He was shot Thursday morning as he exited a home on Île Vaudry, a tiny island east of Montreal that is part of the town of Charlemagne.

The home is owned by a man in his 60s who has a criminal record that dates to 1976 when he pleaded guilty to being in possession of stolen property. In 1993, the man pleaded guilty to obstructing justice and was sentenced to a 60-day prison term.

After he was shot, Montagna jumped into the Assomption River in an apparent attempt to elude the shooter. Police found him on the shore in Charlemagne, and an attempt was made to resuscitate him. He was declared dead after being taken to a nearby hospital.

http://www.josephbrunowriter.com/index.html

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